Phoenix Imago

Phoenix Imago

Recently spent some time with Rob of Phoenix Imago around Rome. This is probably the fastest and most spontaneous multi-collaboration I’ve done also together with British artist Amy Hiley as main photographer.

 

 

Later that night Rob did an intimate acoustic performance at a local cafe/bar in Monti called Pierrot Le Fou. It was a fresh experience – meeting and working for the first time with two uniquely talented folks. It was also so fast, too fast even. One day and a half to shoot everything with little preparation, simply flowing, moving where the creative impulse took us. I’m just grateful to be able to spend time with Rob and Amy. It seemed like hanging out with old friends, fooling around. I do wish them all the success and wild sparks of genius. A special thank you to radiant Alison of Path Less Trodden for making this possible.

Libya 2006

Libya 2006

That is a picture of the ancient Greek and Roman ruins of Libya, from a distance. It is hard to imagine that once upon a time here in this dry desert was a thriving enterprise and an empire teeming with activity, drama, and culture just a few thousand years ago. Perhaps now it is all left completely to our imagination especially after the recent civil war and bombings. Without these landmarks, these fossils, who will remember? Unless one bothers to pick up a book, or look through some photographs, it is as if nothing happened. All turned into dust.

These film photographs were taken in 2006 by my husband Francesco. Back then he had the lucky opportunity to visit (it was never so easy for foreigners to visit Libya under Geddafi). At the time he was so inspired by his experience that he immediately wrote a book, very personal and he was about to publish it but unfortunately one of the real-life characters involved in the book did not approve of it and it had to go hidden until the recent war broke out and a sudden desire to release this work made him rewrite the whole book and publish it this year. I used some of his pictures from the actual trip to create the cover for Libya 2006: Viaggio a tre voci (A Trip in 3 Voices). Here is the design I came up with, my imagination of what Libya feels like.

The publisher has a fixed format for their books so I didn’t have to design the title and text but here is how it looks printed.

It is in Italian and

Francesco

 has some copies if anyone is interested in purchasing. Do you think its a good idea to try and make it available for purchase online?

Piemonte: Pian Muné & Monviso

Piemonte: Pian Muné & Monviso

With the lovely Francesca at Pian Muné, Celtic sacrificial spot up the mountains of Piemonte. Holes on rocks correspond to star formations or constellations. During that special moment when the stars are aligned exactly the way they are drawn on the rocks, the Celts would offer an animal as sacrifice to the gods. Blood would be poured onto the the rocks and would fill these holes and the lines connecting the “dots”. As morbid as that may sound, there is a very powerful and peaceful feeling in this land.

I’m very happy to have found these photos from our trip last year. Also very happy to have met Francesca, Fra’s brilliant ex-girlfriend, who was so generous to host us in this part of Italy, her home. After all that I’ve seen, its become impossible to stereotype Italy – whatever that is or what it means. Its much too complex and diverse – north and south are like two ends of the world. 🙂


Chance Encounters: 3

Chance Encounters: 3

Walking round Giardini Diaz we saw this man picking up heaps of leaves from the side of the road (and there were HEAPS). Nobody else was doing this, surely haven’t seen anyone doing this (by hand) and all the other older men were playing Bocce on the other side of the park. We had a short conversation. He said there are no jobs, yes, but nobody cares to work anymore anyway. He said he felt deeply sad about this.
Chance Encounters: 2

Chance Encounters: 2

We stopped by at La Tazza Ladra (The Cup Thief) for a caffè though I don’t really drink coffee (shameful, I know, in the land of espresso) so I usually get cappuccino con l’orzo (roasted barley “cappuccino”). Despite this the bar guy made it a work of art – with a drizzle of chocolate. Its not like I ordered something special. This is pretty normal fare, but this one, this was really nice. No added cost, no tourist fee either, just plain goodness. Thanks for this man.